Do you own your wedding photographs?

So here’s something a little more controversial, do you own your wedding photographs? For a lot of couples out there the answer is no. You have paid a lot of money most the time in the excess of $2000 and in some cases a lot higher and you don’t own your images, does that seem right to you?

I’m not going to come out and say who is right and wrong, many of today’s wedding and portrait photographers are just following an industry trend that was set many years ago and hasn’t really updated with today’s trends of sharing and viewing items online and on devices.

I can’t tell you how many times I see photographers using marketing tools such as Facebook or Google+ to post images of couple/family/new born etc with the tag line “Do not crop or alter our images in anyway” then with a big water mark across it, it kind of reminds me of a chef not allowing you to use salt and pepper on your meal you just paid for. Now if this was just to protect the client I could totally agree. I do this myself; all images I post on public forums have a watermark. This is to add in advertising as well as let everyone know that in this context of the post or update the image with the text do belong to me. However all my clients have access to full size high resolution unmarked images that they can do with as they please.

I know the arguments other photographers have and many of them are very valid. One which I complete agree on is the reproduction of the work. Photographers have spent many years learning their art. They fine tune there images on colour balanced monitor’s they have the “eye” and know how they would like their images to look. They have spent years developing relationships with printers and labs a like who they can convey how they want their images to look. And I can guarantee an image which the photographer has printed either themselves or at a lab will look better than any image the client prints at home of their personal printer or at the 1 hour minilab.

This too works for both the photographer and the client. The client gets the very best image they can have hanging on their wall, and when people visit they say “WOW, who took that photo?” On the other hand if a photographer is seen by the industry as a “shoot and burn” photographer there is the chance that you’re amazing wedding photograph is printed on a printer that just isn’t up to the task. The reaction from the guest is “Ohh who took that picture?” is not something that photographers want to be associated with.

It is something I have personally weighed up many times. Yes I want all my images to look the absolute best they can. But I also want my clients to have and own their images. As I mentioned in a previous article I come from time before digital cameras, when a lot of professional work other than portraits was shot on transparencies (Slide film). Having worked in as a both medical photographer and advertising photographer, the idea that you owned the work that you have just produced was laughable. Try telling any advertising house that the image you just shoot for their campaign is yours and they can’t have rights to it would have been impossible. And as for medical photography well it goes without saying that any image you create belongs to the hospital and is part of patient records and confidentiality. So why is it the case that the wedding and portrait industry have such tight control over your images?

I have been on the receiving end as well. In recent years we have taken our 2 young’s kids along to a studio to have nice family photographs. We actually wanted the 4 of us in the photographs and have a third party do it to try to help capture some images where the kids weren’t pulling up for dad as is the case now when they see me with the camera. We went to the studio had our 30 minute shoot; they made us coffee and 20 minutes later called us in to sit and view the images. The images where great, no doubt about that. It made me so happy that I had someone else shoot them so we could relax. Them the studio went on to go through the images which as a parent you love all of them. They then show you their price list which until this stage was still not available even though I had asked a few times. Then the horrible realisation sinks in. First this is the one and only time I will see these images unless I pay addition money for an extra viewing session before 6 weeks after 6 weeks the images are gone for good. Second the prices the studio where charging for a simple 10x8 was incredibly high, and third there was no option to have the images at a high resolution on a disc to keep.

It felt horrible. It’s such an emotional and dirty play. But it worked. Ok I would never visit such a tight lipped studio again, but I walked out having ordered over $900 of images which equalled 3 10x8 prints. The other 25 or 30 images of my kids, who were 1 and 3 at the time, I will not see again. It was after that experience I decided I will never keep a client’s images from them.

So how do I manage the make sure that my images are displayed the best they can be will ensuring my clients have high resolution images for their own use? All of the packages we offer at Warnock Imagery have a printed component. It some cases such as our cheapest package it is simply a 10x8 print and a photobook while in our most expensive package we have large canvas gallery prints and printing credit for more work to be done. I see this as a best of both world solutions. Our couples can still get their images printed themselves but at least they have a professionally printed item of some sort to hang on their wall.

It’s an important question to ask when you’re shopping for your wedding photographer; do we get a copy of the images? Please don’t let the photographer dictate to you, if you are told that they retain copyright and that a the image is theirs just remember their business doesn’t exists without you so go find a photographer that will give you want you want. But please also consider using the photographers knowledge and experience to have some images printed you won’t regret it.

Again if you have any questions shoot me an email at enquiries@warnockimagery.com

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And even better if you want to see more of our work head over to Warnock Imagery

Jeremy

Maternity Sessions: By Warnock Imagery Perth Wedding Photography

To most expecting mums pregnancy is a pretty special time.  A time which mum and baby create there first bonds, usually bond that only the teenage years can stretch.  Its also a time that most mum's are also thankful to see the end of when the end does finally come.  Being a dad in a young family I can remember this time and trying to be part of it where I could.  The one thing we did to try to capture the time was take photos, lots and lots of photographs.  Being photographers we had some nice ideas for these images and where able to share them with family, it is because of these images Natalie & I have decided to start offering our own Maternity Sessions.

For our Maternity Sessions we have teamed up with Make Up artist Jana-maree, from Jana-Maree makeup http://www.janamareemakeup.com.au and are offering a great package that involves the expectant  mum being pampered having her hair & make-up done followed by a 1 hour portrait session that can also involve the dad to be and any soon to be big brothers or sisters.

Its a great opportunity and one that Kara, Carl and little Milo loved.  We took great care to include Milo and because of that feel we got some very precious images and was so much fun to do.

So if you or someone you know is interested in a Maternity drop us a line.

Gear Used: Nikon D700 & D300; Nikon 24-70mm F2.8; Nikon 70-200 F2.8; Edited in Aperture

Maternity Sessions By Perth Wedding Photographer Warnock I magery
Maternity Sessions By Perth Wedding Photographer Warnock Imagery
Maternity Sessions By Perth Wedding Photographer Warnock Imagery

A New Stomping Ground

This blog has taken a lot longer to get going then I ever planned, but now I think it is ready.  Its still a little lean on but over the next month or so I hope to change that. So I came to thinking its been not weeks but a month or 2 since I last grabbed my DSLR and even fired the shutter.  Sometimes real life just gets in the way and this has been the case for me and still will be for a little while.  But last Sunday came and after buying my son a pair of bright red wellington boots for winter puddles during the week it was time for him to try them out.  Being West Australia we rarely get winter puddles so a trip to the beach on a cool but bright sunny day was called for.

Gear used: Nikon D300, Nikon 18-200, edited in Aperture & Photoshop CS5

Caleb @ Beach Red Boots

Caleb @ Beach Red Boots

Boys & Puddles

While he may have been sick during the trip to Albany boys will be boys and what 18 month old doesn't enjoy a good dance in a puddle?  Especially if it has your mother panicking during to you already being down with a cold.

Gear used: Nikon D700, Nikon 24-70 F2.8, edited in Aperture

puddles

Introducing a new star...

A new star

The purpose of this blog is really just a place where I can post updates, projects and fun things that do not really relate to the business of Warnock Imagery.  While we take photography many weddings and happy couples what do we do in our off season?  That season is now and hence the birth of this site.  The idea here is to post pictures and updates, successes and failures of things, photography related, I want to try/learn or an just interested in.  And with that in mind I would love to introduce Caleb!  Being 2 photographers first born he will grace this pages as will his younger sister as she be more and more the subject of the lens pointing.

I do truely love this image of our little guy.  We were away for a weekend in Albany West Australia last winter in was cold it was miserable and poor Caleb had such a bad cold, you can see it in his eyes.  But each day as I got to get the camera gear ready I would here " I come too, Dad" and he did. He wouldn't leave our side.

Gear used: Nikon D700, Nikon 24-70 F2.8, edited in Aperture